JUMP CUT
A REVIEW OF CONTEMPORARY MEDIA

 

 

Notes

1. See
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0192634/
regarding Rupert Murdoch’s role in Fox’s abandonment of the production.

2. According to Margaret A. Burnham, the process of mobilizing campaigns by national political interests to influence Federal court nominations began with the battle over Robert Bork. (292)

3. Hill narrates in detail her experience of the Thomas nomination and hearing process in Anita Hill, Speaking Truth to Power (NY: Doubleday, 1997) with a view to analyzing the responses of individual senators on the Judiciary Committee and others to her charges. She discusses the hearing itself as a process of constructing narratives in “Marriage and Patronage in the Empowerment and Disempowerment of African American Women (273-4) in Anita Faye Hill and Emma Coleman Jordan, eds., Race, Gender, and Power in America: The Legacy of the Hill-Thomas Hearings (NY: Oxford UP, 1995): 271-291.

4. See also Morrison xviii-xix.

5. For an analysis of this pronouncement as speech act, see Lacour (151) and Thomas (364-72); see also Lacour’s discussion of victimization here as scapegoating (151) and a similar comparison to rituals of totemism (Bhabha 246-9); for a discussion of racial roles and stereotyping in the larger Hill/Thomas discourse, see Lubiano (323-61).

6. Elsewhere I have discussed “interaction” as a warranting strategy characteristic of docudrama. Interaction strategies pull together actual and staged scene elements to warrant the validity of docudramatic re-creation. See Lipkin, Real Emotional Logic (Carbondale: Southern Illinois UP, 2002): 25-7.

7. In their description of this moment, Mayer and Abramson add the following:

"Originally such speculation would be considered so prejudicial that it would never be allowed in an open court, let alone a Senate hearing. But that Saturday, the Republicans on the Judiciary Committee read portions from both The Exorcist and the 10th Circuit case out loud. Duberstein even told Hatch to hold up a copy of the book when questioning Thomas, on the theory that photos of the incriminating moment would run on the front page of every newspaper the following morning." (302)

8. See, for example, David E. Rosenbaum and Lynette Clemetson, “In Fight to Confirm New Justice, Two Field Generals Rally Their Troops Again,” New York Times, 3 July 2005:15; and Matt Bai, “The Framing Wars,” The New York Times Magazine, 17 July 2005: 38-45ff.

Works cited

Barstow, David, and Robin Stein. “Under Bush, A New Age of Prepackaged News. New York Times, 13 Mar. 2005, late national ed., 1.

Burnham, Margaret A. “The Supreme Court Appointment Process and the Politics of Race and Sex,” in Morrison, Toni, ed. Race-ing Justice, En-gendering Power: Essays on Anita Hill, Clarence Thomas, and the Construction of Social Reality. NY: Pantheon, 1992: 290-322.

Dowd, Maureen. “Liberties; Keep Your Shirt On!” New York Times, 25 Aug. 1999, late ed., sec. A:23.

Flax, Jane. The American Dream in Black and White: The Clarence Thomas Hearings. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1998.

Fries, Laura. “Strange Justice.” Daily Variety, 27 Aug. 1999.

Gilbert, Matthew. “Strange Justice Spins Different View.” Boston Globe, 27 Aug. 1999, E1.

Harris, Lyle V. “Story Embellishments Turn Justice Strange.” Atlanta Constitution, 4F.

Hazen, Don, “The Right Wing Express,” Alternet, 7 February 2005,
http://www.alternet.org/story/21192/.

Hill, Michael E. “Showtime’s Strange Justice.” Washington Post, 29 August, 1999, Y04.

James, Caryn. “He Said, She Said, and the Whole Nation Listened.” New York Times, 27 Aug. 1999, late edition, sec. E:29.

Lacour, Claudia Brodsky. “Doing Things With Words: ‘Racism’ as Speech act and the Undoing of Justice,” in Morrison, Toni, ed. Race-ing Justice, En-gendering Power: Essays on Anita Hill, Clarence Thomas, and the Construction of Social Reality. NY: Pantheon, 1992: 127-58.

Lubiano, Wahneema. “Black Ladies, Welfare Queens, and State Minstrels: Ideological War by Narrative Means,” in Morrison, Toni, ed. Race-ing Justice, En-gendering Power: Essays on Anita Hill, Clarence Thomas, and the Construction of Social Reality. NY: Pantheon, 1992: 323-61.

Marable, Manning. “Clarence Thomas and the Crisis of Black Political Culture,” in Morrison, Toni, ed. Race-ing Justice, En-gendering Power: Essays on Anita Hill, Clarence Thomas, and the Construction of Social Reality. NY: Pantheon, 1992: 61-85.

Mayer, Jane, and Jill Abramson. Strange Justice: The Selling of Clarence Thomas. NY: Houghton Mifflin, 1994.

Miller, Anita. The Complete Transcripts of the Clarence Thomas—Anita Hill Hearings October 11, 12, 13, 1991. Chicago: Academy Chicago Publishers, 1994.

Mink, Eric. “Doing ‘Justice’ To History: Hill-Thomas Telefilm Alters Facts But Finds the Dramatic Essence.” Daily News, 27 Aug. 1999, 135.

Moore, Frazier. “Strange Justice Revisits Divisive Debate.” Dayton Daily News, 29 Aug. 1999.

Morrison, Toni, “Introduction: Friday on the Potomac,” in Morrison, Toni, ed. Race-ing Justice, En-gendering Power: Essays on Anita Hill, Clarence Thomas, and the Construction of Social Reality. NY: Pantheon, 1992: vi-xxx.

Rich, Frank. “Enron: Patron Saint of Bush’s Fake News.” New York Times, 20 Mar. 2005, late national ed., sec. 2:1+.

 “Strange Justice Favours Anita Hill.” Calgary Herald, 23 Aug. 1999, B6.

Thomas, Kendall, “Strange Fruit,” in Morrison, Toni, ed. Race-ing Justice, En-gendering Power: Essays on Anita Hill, Clarence Thomas, and the Construction of Social Reality. NY: Pantheon, 1992: 364-389.

Thompson, Kevin D. “Thomas vs. Hill: The Drama of Strange Justice.” Palm Beach Post, 29 Aug. 1999, 1J.

Weinraub, Bernard. “Hill vs. Thomas, Again in the Court of Senate Opinion.” New York Times, 22 Aug. 1999, late ed., sec. 2:31.


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