JUMP CUT
A REVIEW OF CONTEMPORARY MEDIA

 

 

Notes

[1] A few acknowledgments are necessary: To Silvia Malagrino for her generosity of spirit and friendship. In addition to sharing her work with me, Silvia spared hours of her time for interviews, emails, and follow up. To Louis Takacs, International Documents Librarian at Northwestern University, for his assistance with data on Argentine immigration. To Tamara Falicov, María de los Angeles Torres, Chuck Kleinhans, and Julia Lesage for their intellectual support and critical insights. And, to Philippe Geyskens for his technical support; my interviews would have been impossible without a new MP3 recorder and his computer expertise. Parts of this essay were originally presented at the Society for Cinema and Media Studies meeting in Philadelphia, March 2008. Many thanks to the audience members who provided valuable feedback. [return to page 1 of essay]

[2] According to the Statistical Yearbook of the Immigration and Naturalization Service nearly 22,000 Argentines immigrated to the United States between 1976 and 1984, the years of the Argentine dictatorship. Because of the relationship between Argentina and the U.S., most of these immigrants were not recognized as political refugees or as asylum seekers. Malagrino, for instance, entered the U.S. as a student and would likely not have been recognized for the political refugee that she felt herself to be.

[3] “The Stream of Life,” one channel digital video projection in a loop, was first installed in the Florence Bienalle of International Contemporary Art at the Fortezza da Basso, Florence, Italy, December 3 to 11, 2005. It won the First Price Lorenzo il Magnifico Award in New Media.

Works cited

Aufderheide, Patricia. “Public Intimacy: The Development of the First-Person Video Documentary.” AfterImage vol 25 issue 1 (1997): 16-18. Accessed and paginated via Gale Academic OneFile,
<http://find.galegroup.com.turing.library.
northwestern.edu/itx/start.do?prodId=AONE
>.

Burnt Oranges. Dir. Silvia Malagrino. 2005. 90 minutes. DVD.

Ciezadlo, Janina. “History and Memory: Burnt Oranges by Silvia Malagrino.” AfterImage. vol, 33 no. 4 (January/February, 2006) 46-68.

Galeano, Eduardo. “The Dictatorship and Its Aftermath: The Secret Wounds.” Mariani, Philomena, ed. Critical Fictions: The politics of Imaginative Writing. Seattle, W.A.: Bay Press, 1991: 254-258.

Goldman, Ilene S. “Latin American Women’s Film and Videomaking: The Case of Cine Mujer, Bogotá, Colombia.” Noriega, Chon A. (Editor). Visible Nation: Latin American Cinema and Video. Minneapolis, MN, USA: University of Minnesota Press, 2000.

Malagrino, Silvia. Personal Interview. Chicago, IL. January 24, 2008.

Malagrino, Silvia. Personal Interview. Chicago, IL. October 10, 2007.

Munif, Abdelrahman. “Exile and the Writer.” Mariani, Philomena, ed. Critical Fictions: The Politics of Imaginative Writing. Seattle, W.A.: Bay Press, 1991: 108-111.

Naficy, Hamid, ed.. Home, House, Homeland: Film, Media, and the Politics of Place. NY: Routledge, 1999.

Naficy, Hamid. An Accented Cinema: Exilic and Diasporic Filmmaking. Princeton, N. J.: Princeton University Press, 2001.

Ortiz, Alicia Dujovne. “Buenos Aires.” Mariani, Philomena, ed. Critical Fictions: The Politics of Imaginative Writing. Seattle, W.A.: Bay Press, 1991: 115-130.

Sims, Calvin. “Argentine Tells of Dumping ‘Dirty War’ Captives into Sea.” New York Times. March 13, 1995.

“Stream of Life.” Dir. Silvia Malagrino. Originally installed at the Florence Bienalle of International Contemporary Art at the Fortezza da Basso, Florence, Italy, December 3 to 11, 2005. One channel digital video projection. 3:53 minutes.Viewed on DVD.

U.S. Department of Justice, Immigration and Naturalization Service. Statistical Yearbook of the Immigration and Naturalization Service. 1985.

Wright, Thomas C. State Terrorism in Latin America. Lanham, M.D.: Rowman and Littlefield, 2007.


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