JUMP CUT
A REVIEW OF CONTEMPORARY MEDIA

 

 

Notes

1. Richard Meyer, Outlaw Representation (NY: Oxford University Press, 2002), 15. [return to page 1 of essay]

2. Annette Kuhn in Meyer, 16

3. Meyer, 15.

4. Meyer, 19.

5. Meyer, 5.

6. See Jan Zita Grover, “Visible Lesions: Images of People With AIDS,” Afterimage 17:1 (Summer 1989): 10-16. Grover provides a timeline of AIDS representation from 1981-1988, arguing how gay men, gay media and gay service organizations were the first to respond to the damning images of AIDS found in the mainstream media, creating instead, images of AIDS with which gay people could identify “because of shared history and concerns.”

7. See, for example, James Meyer, “AIDS and Postmodernism,” Arts Magazine 66:8 (April 1992): pp. 60-68; Jeffrey Weeks, “Postmodern AIDS?” in Tessa Boffin and Sunil Gupta, eds., Ecstatic Anti-Bodies (London: Rivers Oram Press, 1990), pp. 133-141; Lee Edelman, “The Mirror and the Tank: ‘AIDS,’ Subjectivity, and the Rhetoric of Activism,” in Timothy Murphy and Suzanne Poirier, eds., Writing AIDS (NY: Columbia University Press, 1993), pp. 9-38. Murphy writes:

“intellectual efforts to theorize the epidemic, its constructions, and its representations, frequently invoke, toward differing ends and with varying degrees of insight and engagement, some notion of the postmodern,” pp. 10-11.

8. Excerpted from Chapter One, pgs. 1-3, Alexandra Juhasz, AIDS TV. Copyright 1995, Duke University Press. All rights reserved. Used by permission of the publisher.

9. Excerpted from Chapter Six, pg. 194, AIDS TV. Copyright 1995, Duke University Press. All rights reserved. Used by permission of the publisher.

10. Excerpted from Chapter Six, pg. 193, AIDS TV. Copyright 1995, Duke University Press. All rights reserved. Used by permission of the publisher.

11. Douglas Crimp in Meyer, 265. [return to page 2]

12. Marjorie Heins, Not in Front of the Children (NY: Hill and Wang, 2001), 257.

13. Alexandra Juhasz, “The Failures of the Flesh and the Revival of AIDS Activism,” first published in and with permission from Failure: Experiments in Aesthetics and Social Practices, eds. Nicole Antebi, Colin Dickey and Robbie Herbst (LA: The Journal of Aesthetics and Protest Press, 2007): 136-139 and 140.

14. Meyer, 267.

15. Ultra-Red Artists’ Statement. Make Art/Stop AIDS. 2008.

16. Heins, 12

17. Justice Robert H. Jackson in Potentially Harmful: The Art of American Censorship, ed., Cathy Byrd (Georgia State University Press, 2006).


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